United States Theater

    Marquis Theatre, Northeast USA
  Broadway & 46th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Now playing: Evita.
Opened in 1986, the Marquis Theatre is one of the newest theatres to be built on Broadway. Located inside the Marriott Marquis Hotel, it was designed to provide maximum comfort for audiences and actors while conveying a feeling of intimacy. The venue features expansive backstage, high ceilings, state-of-the-art acoustics, wide aisles, comfortable seats, ample restrooms and parking.
Since its opening, the theatre has showcased a series of hit musicals including Me and My Girl, Gypsy, Man of La Mancha, The Goodbye Girl, Damn Yankees, Victor/Victoria, Peter Pan, Annie Get Your Gun and Thoroughly Modern Millie. Before or after seeing The Drowsy Chaperone, theatergoers can dine at one of the fine restaurants located throughout the hotel.
The Marquis has 1,611 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization's nine Broadway theatres.
    Shubert Theatre, Northeast USA
  225 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Shubert Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 225 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York, United States.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. It opened on October 21, 1913 with a series of Shakespearean plays, including Othello, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.
The theatre's most famous and longest tenant was A Chorus Line, with a run of 6137 performances lasting nearly fifteen years.
The top floor of the building houses the offices of the Shubert Organization. The theatre's auditorium and murals were restored in 1996. It has been designated a New York City landmark. Source
    Minskoff Theatre, Northeast USA
  200 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Disney presents a musical that brings The Lion King's wildly popular story, the Oscar winning Elton John / Tim Rice songs, and an entire African landscape to the stage of the specially adapted Minskoff Theater. Directed and designed by Tony Award winner Julie Taymor, THE LION KING fills the theatre with sights and sounds of one of Broadways most imaginative new talents - all to bring new life to Disneys crowd pleasing story of a young princes adventure-filled journey to adulthood - and the throne.
Giraffes strut, birds swoop, gazelles leap! The entire savanna comes to life and, as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly rises out of the stage. This is The Lion King. The winner of six 1998 Tony Awards, including Best New Musical, it is the story of a young lion cub named Simba who struggles to accept the responsibilities of adulthood and his destined role as king. To bring the classic 1994 film to life, Disney turned to the story's roots, its rich mythology, powerful human drama and primal African rhythms to create a fantastic new musical unlike anything Broadway has ever seen.
The modern theatre, with a very large seating capacity of 1,621 seats, was designed by the architectural firm of Kahn and Jacobs and offers a spectacular view of the Great White Way from the glass front of the building on all levels of the theatre.
    Ethel Barrymore Theatre, Northeast USA
  243 West 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 243 West 47th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp and constructed by the Shuberts, it opened on December 20, 1928 with The Kingdom of God, a play selected by leading lady Ethel Barrymore. Over the next dozen years she returned to star in The Love Duel (1929), Scarlett Sister Mary (1930), The School for Scandal (1931), and An International Incident (1940).
It is the only surviving theatre of the many the Shuberts built for performers who were affiliated with them. It has been used continuously as a legitimate house, unlike many of the older theatres that have been used for a variety of purposes throughout the years. Source
    Longacre Theatre, Northeast USA
  220 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theatre located at 220 West 48th Street in midtown Manhattan.
Designed by architect Henry B. Herts, it was named for Longacre Square, the original name for Times Square. The French neo-classical building was constructed by impresario Harry Frazee, better remembered as the owner of the Boston Red Sox who, needing money for his theatrical ventures, sold Babe Ruth's contract to the New York Yankees. A curse allegedly lingers on the theater as a result, and superstitious producers avoid it for fear they'll be backing a flop, as noted by William Golden in his seminal book The Season. Despite the rumor, a large number of performers who have appeared on stage here have taken home a Tony Award for their efforts.
The Longacre's first show was a production of the William Hurlbut-Frances Whitehouse comedy Are You a Crook?, which opened on May 1, 1913. With the exception of its use as a television studio in the mid-1940s to early 1950s, the theatre has operated as a legitimate Broadway venue. Source
    Belasco Theatre, Northeast USA
  111 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Belasco Theatre is a legitmate Broadway theatre located at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco, the interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space.
Technically it was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available, including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space.
It opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. Three years later Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. The Shuberts bought it in 1949 and leased it to NBC for three years before returning it to legitimate use.
This theater is the subject of an urban legend that David Belasco's ghost haunts the theater every night. Some performers in the shows that played there have even claimed to have spotted him or other ghosts during performances. Source
    Neil Simon Teatre, Northeast USA
  250 West 52nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Since 1927, this theatre was known as the Alvin. It was renamed in 1983 to honor America’s most prolific playwright, Neil Simon, following the successful engagement of Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play of an autobiographical trilogy about his youth with his family. Fittingly, in 1985, the second play of Mr. Simon’s trilogy, Biloxi Blues played there successfully. In 1992, Mr. Simon returned again with his play, Jake’s Women.
Since 2000, the Neil Simon has been filled with music and dancing as the home to two of Broadway’s most popular productions, namely the acclaimed revival of The Music Man and, currently, the Tony Award®-winning Best Musical, Hairspray.
The Neil Simon Theatre has 1,445 seats and is one of The Nederlander Organization’s nine Broadway theatres.
    St.George Theatre, Northeast USA
  35 Hyatt Street (2 blocks from the ferry) - Staten Island, NY           
The magnificent St. George Theatre shines once again and serves Staten Island and all of New York. By polishing this treasured jewel, the integrity of its' unique structure will be maintained and a major boost will be given to the revitalization efforts of this North Shore community. It serves as a cultural arts center for a myriad of activities including outreach educational programs, architectural tours, television and film shoots, concerts, comedy, Broadway touring companies, children's shows and many local community events and performances.
    Theatre Jacksonville, Southeast USA
  2032 San Marco Boulevard - Jacksonville, FL            
A a volunteer-based community theatre whose mission is to create opportunities for community participation in theatre arts. This mission mandates inclusion and the development of diversity in the Company's artistic, volunteer, audience and donor bases. This goal is achieved through presenting plays and programs of noted artistic excellence, supporting volunteers and students with exceptional training opportunities, and allowing for the development of unique and/or original performance projects and events by Florida artists.
    Hollywood Bowl, Southwest USA
  2301 North Highland Avenue - Hollywood, CA            
One of the largest natural amphitheaters in the world, with a current seating capacity of just under 18,000, the Hollywood Bowl has been the summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic since its official opening in 1922, and, in 1991 gave its name to a resident ensemble that has filled a special niche in the musical life of Southern California, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra.
    Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, Southeast USA
  829 N. Davis Street - Jacksonville, FL           
The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum Celebrates the rich legacy of the African-American community that thrived in LaVilla for more than 100 years. The theatre and museum are revered as the premiere cultural institution in Jacksonville, Florida, showcasing art, music, drama, poetry, and African American history.
The stories and legends of LaVilla, known as the "Harlem of the South," live on within the walls of the refurbished museum and theatre. Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum is committed to reclaiming the past, celebrating the present, and embracing the future.
    Virginia Theatre, Midwest USA
  203 W. Park - Chicago, IL            
Since 1921, The Virginia Theatre has been a landmark in the business district of Champaign, and in the history of the region. For 75 years, the 1525 seat theatre has offered entertainment as a vaudeville house, legitimate theatre, and movie house. After over three decades as a movie house primarily, the Theatre made the return to live performances in May of 1991 with a live theatre/concert called Songs of America. The show sold out and they had to turn away 200 people. This was the first show at the theatre since the theatre was dedicated to films only. In January of 2000, the Champaign Park District joined in the efforts to save this prized landmark. After assuming control of the theatre, the Park District embarked on a massive renovation to bring the facility back to its original glory and in compliance with local safety ordinances. After renovations are complete, the Virginia Theatre will continue its tradition of quality entertainment that was sparked by such legendary performers such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Red Skelton, Will Rogers, W.C. Fields and the Marx Brothers.
    Kodak Theatre, Southwest USA
  6801 Hollywood Boulevard - Hollywood, CA           
Kodak Theatre is the crown jewel of the Hollywood & Highland Center retail, dining and entertainment complex located in the heart of historic Hollywood. The 3,332 seat theatre opened in November 2001 and soon thereafter became known to more than one billion people across the globe as the first permanent home of the Academy Awards®.
Built at a cost of $94 million, Kodak Theatre was designed by the internationally-renowned Rockwell Group to be as glamorous as its onstage artists and celebrity guests, yet capable of serving the enormous technical needs of a live worldwide television broadcast on Oscar® night. The naming of Kodak Theatre, in a 20-year marketing partnership with Eastman Kodak Co., was one of the most significant non-sports corporate sponsorships in history. Kodak’s prominence and long-standing connection to the film industry in Hollywood made the relationship a natural. In fact, for the 78th consecutive year, ever since the inception of the Academy Awards, Best Picture was produced on Kodak film.
    Barrymore Theatre, Midwest USA
  2090 Atwood Avenue - Madison, WI            
The Barrymore Theatre (originally The Eastwood) was built in 1929 as the third movie theater erected in Madison, Wisconsin. It sustained itself as a neighborhood movie theater until the late 70's. The theater was briefly vacant in the early 80's and was renovated into a live events theatre in 1987. That is when it took up it's present name, and began the transformation into what it is today. Source
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