United States Theater

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Belasco Theatre, Northeast USA
  111 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Belasco Theatre is a legitmate Broadway theatre located at 111 West 44th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect George Keister for impresario David Belasco, the interior featured Tiffany lighting and ceiling panels, rich woodwork and expansive murals, and a ten-room duplex penthouse apartment that Belasco utilized as combination living quarters/office space.
Technically it was outfitted with the most advanced stagecraft tools available, including extensive lighting rigs, a hydraulics system, and vast wing and fly space.
It opened as the Stuyvesant Theatre on October 16, 1907 with the musical A Grand Army Man with Antoinette Perry. Three years later Belasco attached his own name to the venue. After his death in 1931, it was leased first by actress Katharine Cornell and then playwright Elmer Rice. The Shuberts bought it in 1949 and leased it to NBC for three years before returning it to legitimate use.
This theater is the subject of an urban legend that David Belasco's ghost haunts the theater every night. Some performers in the shows that played there have even claimed to have spotted him or other ghosts during performances. Source
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Booth Theatre, Northeast USA
  222 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York City.
The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first was built by Booth himself in 1869 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue.
The Booth Theatre appeared in the West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlett attended while pondering the planned assassination of the Quamari Defence Minister. Source
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Barrymore Theatre, Midwest USA
  2090 Atwood Avenue - Madison, WI              
The Barrymore Theatre (originally The Eastwood) was built in 1929 as the third movie theater erected in Madison, Wisconsin. It sustained itself as a neighborhood movie theater until the late 70's. The theater was briefly vacant in the early 80's and was renovated into a live events theatre in 1987. That is when it took up it's present name, and began the transformation into what it is today. Source
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Broadway Theatre, Northeast USA
  1681 Broadway - Theatre District - New York, NY              
Coming up: Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella. Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is coming to Broadway for the first time ever! Four-time Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane’s (Sister Act, Xanadu) delightfully romantic and hilarious take on the ultimate makeover story features all the classic elements you remember—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists! Rediscover some of Rodgers + Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago" in this outrageously fun Broadway musical for dreamers of all ages. And not to worry... you'll be home well before the stroke of midnight!
The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Eugene DeRosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. It was re-named Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930 . (In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films). The Shuberts bought it in 1939. It was renovated extensively in 1956 and 1986. The large stage (nearly sixty feet deep) and seating capacity (1761) have made it a popular theatre for musicals throughout the years.
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Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, Northeast USA
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source
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Round House Theatre Silver Spring, Northeast USA
  8641 Colesville Road - Silver Spring, MD              
One of the largest and most acclaimed professional theatre companies in the metro Washington, DC area, Round House Theatre is led by Producing Artistic Director Blake Robison, who joined the company in June 2005. Based in Montgomery County, Maryland, Round House Theatre produces nearly 200 theatrical performances each season at its 400-seat Bethesda theatre and 150-seat black box theatre in Silver Spring. The company operates an education center in Silver Spring and annually reaches over 40,000 patrons there and across the region with strong educational programs.
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Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, Northeast USA
  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY              
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
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Center for Performing Arts, Northeast USA
  661 Route 308 - Rhinebeck, NY              
The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck (known familiarly as The CENTER, and legally as Rhinebeck Performing Arts, Inc. or RPA) is a non-profit arts organization which offers performances and classes throughout the year. Performing and teaching artists are of local, national and international talent.
The Center serves as a regular performance venue for local theater companies including CENTERstage Productions (Death of a Salesman, Cabaret, My Fair Lady) the Gilbert & Sullivan Musical Theater Company (The Mikado, A Little Night Music, The Pirates of Penzance), Kids on Stage (Cinderella, The Emperor's New Clothes), Rhinebeck Theater Society (HONK!, The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Abridged, Oliver!), and Up In One Productions (Chicago, Fiddler on the Roof, The Wizard of Oz). The CENTER also hosts appearances by artists such as Jeff Boyer, Brian Bradley, Elaine Colandrea, Alpin Hong, Kitty Jones, Jeff McBride, The Puppet People, Solas an Lae, Tanglewood Marionettes, Pitchfork Militia, Barbara Rankin, and David Temple, to name a few.
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Barter Theatre, Northeast USA
  127 West Main Street - Virginia, VA              
"Our passion can be felt in two unique venues of live performance. From Barter Theatre, able to accommodate 507 patrons, to the more intimate Barter Stage II with 167 seats around a thrust stage...where the action is up-close and personal. Set inside a historical building across the street from Barter Theatre, Barter Stage II is a great place to enjoy a Barter production. Also, located in the lobby at Barter Stage II is The Caf?. You can stop in for lunch or dinner any day, and enjoy delicious specialty sandwiches, desserts, coffees and more! The Player Company, the youth stage of the Barter, produces plays for teachers and students."
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Virginia Theatre, Midwest USA
  203 W. Park - Chicago, IL              
Since 1921, The Virginia Theatre has been a landmark in the business district of Champaign, and in the history of the region. For 75 years, the 1525 seat theatre has offered entertainment as a vaudeville house, legitimate theatre, and movie house. After over three decades as a movie house primarily, the Theatre made the return to live performances in May of 1991 with a live theatre/concert called Songs of America. The show sold out and they had to turn away 200 people. This was the first show at the theatre since the theatre was dedicated to films only. In January of 2000, the Champaign Park District joined in the efforts to save this prized landmark. After assuming control of the theatre, the Park District embarked on a massive renovation to bring the facility back to its original glory and in compliance with local safety ordinances. After renovations are complete, the Virginia Theatre will continue its tradition of quality entertainment that was sparked by such legendary performers such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Red Skelton, Will Rogers, W.C. Fields and the Marx Brothers.
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Hollywood Bowl, Southwest USA
  2301 North Highland Avenue - Hollywood, CA              
One of the largest natural amphitheaters in the world, with a current seating capacity of just under 18,000, the Hollywood Bowl has been the summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic since its official opening in 1922, and, in 1991 gave its name to a resident ensemble that has filled a special niche in the musical life of Southern California, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra.
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Theatre Jacksonville, Southeast USA
  2032 San Marco Boulevard - Jacksonville, FL              
A a volunteer-based community theatre whose mission is to create opportunities for community participation in theatre arts. This mission mandates inclusion and the development of diversity in the Company's artistic, volunteer, audience and donor bases. This goal is achieved through presenting plays and programs of noted artistic excellence, supporting volunteers and students with exceptional training opportunities, and allowing for the development of unique and/or original performance projects and events by Florida artists.
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Kodak Theatre, Southwest USA
  6801 Hollywood Boulevard - Hollywood, CA              
Kodak Theatre is the crown jewel of the Hollywood & Highland Center retail, dining and entertainment complex located in the heart of historic Hollywood. The 3,332 seat theatre opened in November 2001 and soon thereafter became known to more than one billion people across the globe as the first permanent home of the Academy Awards®.
Built at a cost of $94 million, Kodak Theatre was designed by the internationally-renowned Rockwell Group to be as glamorous as its onstage artists and celebrity guests, yet capable of serving the enormous technical needs of a live worldwide television broadcast on Oscar® night. The naming of Kodak Theatre, in a 20-year marketing partnership with Eastman Kodak Co., was one of the most significant non-sports corporate sponsorships in history. Kodak’s prominence and long-standing connection to the film industry in Hollywood made the relationship a natural. In fact, for the 78th consecutive year, ever since the inception of the Academy Awards, Best Picture was produced on Kodak film.
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Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, Southeast USA
  829 N. Davis Street - Jacksonville, FL              
The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum Celebrates the rich legacy of the African-American community that thrived in LaVilla for more than 100 years. The theatre and museum are revered as the premiere cultural institution in Jacksonville, Florida, showcasing art, music, drama, poetry, and African American history.
The stories and legends of LaVilla, known as the "Harlem of the South," live on within the walls of the refurbished museum and theatre. Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum is committed to reclaiming the past, celebrating the present, and embracing the future.