North America Theater

    Lyceum Theatre, United States
  149 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Lyceum Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 149 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
It has the distinction of being the oldest surviving Broadway venue (along with the New Amsterdam Theatre), the oldest continuously operating legitimate theatre in New York City, and the first Broadway theatre ever to be granted landmark status. It is one of the few theatres in New York to operate under its original name.
The theatre maintains most of its original Beaux-Arts design, including its elaborate marble staircases and undulating marquee. Although it has three levels, it is one of the smallest Broadway theatres in terms of capacity, seating only 950. An apartment located above the orchestra, originally used by Frohman, is now the headquarters of the Shubert Archives. Source
    American Airlines Theatre, United States
  227 West 42nd Street - Theatre District - New York, NY             
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    Vivian Beaumont Theater, United States
  150 West 65th Street - (at Lincoln Center) - New York, NY           
The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a theater in New York City in the United States. It is located at Lincoln Center, 150 W. 65th Street, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It was designed by the renowned Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen. Although it was built for the presentation of plays such as those produced on Broadway, it differs from traditional Broadway theaters because of its amphitheater configuration and thrust stage. The building includes two auditoriums, the 1,080-seat Vivian Beaumont Theater and the 299-seat Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater (called The Forum until 1973). The Beaumont is considered a fairly large theater for dramatic plays and a medium-size theater for musicals. It is New York's only Broadway-class theater (eligible for Tony Awards) that is not located in the Theater District near Times Square. Source
    Gershwin Theatre, United States
  222 West 51st Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The George Gershwin Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 51st Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed in an Art Nouveau style by set designer Ralph Alswang, it is situated on the lower levels of a towering office complex built on the side of the historical Capitol Theatre. It opened as the Uris Theatre on November 28, 1972 with the musical Via Galactica starring Raul Julia. It proved to be an inauspicious start for the venue, closing after only seven performances. From 1974-76 it served as a concert hall for limited engagements by a number of legendary pop music and jazz performers.
It was the first theatre constructed in New York City since 1928. With a seating capacity of 1933, it presently is the largest theatre on Broadway, with the exception of the New York State Theatre at Lincoln Center and New York City Center.
A Theatre Hall of Fame located in the lobby is a popular gathering place for audience members pre-show and during intermission. Source
    Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, United States
  242 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 242 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp, it opened as the Royale Theatre on January 11, 1927 with a musical entitled Piggy. John Golden leased and renamed the theatre for himself from 1932 to 1937, when the Shubert Organization assumed ownership and leased the theater to CBS Radio until 1940, when it was restored to its original use and name. On May 9, 2005, it was renamed for longtime Shubert Organization president Bernard B. Jacobs. Source
    Apollo Theater, United States
  253 West 125th Street - Harlem - New York, NY             
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Yesterday…A place where thousands of young artists have stepped out into the spotlight and launched their careers. A place "where stars are born and legends are made." The legendary Apollo Theater is so much more than an historic landmark - it is a source of pride and a symbol of the brilliance of American artistic achievement. From 1934 when the Apollo first introduced its world-famous Amateur Night which launched the careers of legendary artists like Ella Fitzgerald, James Brown, Michael Jackson, D'Angelo and Lauryn Hill, the Apollo has maintained its position as the nation's most popular arena for emerging and established black and Latino performers.
    Al Hirschfeld Theatre, United States
  Marvin Beck Theatre - 302 West 45th Street - New York, NY           
A legitimate Broadway theatre located at 302 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan. Designed by architect G. Albert Lansburgh for vaudeville promoter Martin Beck, the theatre opened as the Martin Beck Theatre with a production of Madame Pompadour on November 11, 1924. It was the only theater in New York that was owned outright without a mortgage. It was designed to be the most opulent theater of its time, and has dressing rooms for 200 actors. The theatre has a seating capacity of 1,292 for plays and 1,282 for musicals.
This is one of five theatres owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. Source: en.wikipeddia.org
    Theatre Jacksonville, United States
  2032 San Marco Boulevard - Jacksonville, FL            
A a volunteer-based community theatre whose mission is to create opportunities for community participation in theatre arts. This mission mandates inclusion and the development of diversity in the Company's artistic, volunteer, audience and donor bases. This goal is achieved through presenting plays and programs of noted artistic excellence, supporting volunteers and students with exceptional training opportunities, and allowing for the development of unique and/or original performance projects and events by Florida artists.
    Cort Theatre, United States
  138 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Cort Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 138 West 48th Street in midtown-Manhattan. The Shuberts purchased the theatre in 1927.
Designed by Thomas W. Lamb, its facade was modeled after the Petit Trianon at Versailles, while architecture from the period of Louis XVI inspired the interior. The building was constructed by and named for former vaudevillean John Cort, general manager of the Northwestern Theatrical Association.
It opened on December 20, 1912 with Laurette Taylor starring in the play Peg o' My Heart, which ran for 603 performance, an auspicious start for the new venue. Numerous famous British actors have appeared at the Cort: Basil Rathbone played Dr. Nicholas Agi in The Swan in October 1923, and in April 1927 appeared as Vladimir Dubriski in Love is Like That. In October 1924 Henry Daniell appeared as Aubrey Tanqueray in The Second Mrs Tanqueray, was there again in August 1943 in Murder Without Crime, and in January 1946 appeared as Leontes in The Winter's Tale.
The theatre was used as a television studio housing The Merv Griffin Show from 1969-72. Source
    Palace Theater, United States
  Broadway and 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Palace Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1564 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architects Kirchoff & Rose, the theatre, built by California vaudeville entrepreneur and Broadway impresario Martin Beck, experienced a number of problems before it opened. E. F. Albee, one of the main executives for B. F. Keith and his powerful vaudeville circuit, demanded that Beck turn over three-quarters of the stock in the theatre in order to use acts from the Keith circuit. In addition, Oscar Hammerstein was the only person who could offer Keith acts in that section of Broadway, so Beck paid him off with $225,000. The theatre finally opened on March 24, 1913 with headliner Ed Wynn. To "play the Palace" meant that an entertainer had reached the pinnacle of his career, and it became a popular venue with performers like Sarah Bernhardt, Eddie Cantor, Bob Hope, Fanny Brice, Sophie Tucker, George Jessel, and Jack Benny. Source
    Circle in the Square Theatre, United States
  1633 Broadway (at 50th Street) - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Circle in the Square Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 235 West 50th Street in midtown Manhattan.
Designed by architect Alan Sayles, it is one of two theatres occupying the underground levels of Paramount Plaza, which was constructed as the Uris Building on the site of the famed Capitol Theater movie house. It originally served as the uptown home to the Circle-in-the-Square repertory company founded by Theodore Mann and Jose Quintero in 1961 in Greenwich Village. The first production, a revival of Mourning Becomes Electra, opened on November 15, 1972.
The rather small auditorium has a seating capacity of 650. It is one of only two Broadway houses with a thrust stage (the other is Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theatre).
The building also houses the Circle in the Square Theatre School, the only accredited training conservatory associated with a Broadway theatre, which offers a two-year training program in acting. Source
    Laura Pels Theatre, United States
  111 West 46th Street - New York, NY           
Lanford Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy Talley’s Folly returns in a joyful and moving new production starring Tony Award® nominee Danny Burstein (Golden Boy, Follies) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® nominee Sarah Paulson (“American Horror Story,” Roundabout’s Crimes of the Heart).
At the end of World War II, Matt Friedman, a Jewish immigrant who has spent his life keeping others at a distance, returns to the small town where he first met Sally Talley. Nothing like her conservative Protestant family and neighbors, Sally is a nurse with deep misgivings about the country’s future. After a lifetime of believing they’ll never truly belong in the world around them, Matt has worked up the courage to ask Sally for her hand, and convince her that they do belong—together.
Michael Wilson (The Best Man, Roundabout’s The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore) directs this funny and heart-warming play about finding love when you’ve nearly given up looking.
Performances begin on February 8, 2013 with an Opening Night of March 5, 2013 at the Laura Pels Theatre in the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre (111 West 46th Street). This is a limited engagement through April 28, 2013.
    Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, United States
  829 N. Davis Street - Jacksonville, FL           
The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum Celebrates the rich legacy of the African-American community that thrived in LaVilla for more than 100 years. The theatre and museum are revered as the premiere cultural institution in Jacksonville, Florida, showcasing art, music, drama, poetry, and African American history.
The stories and legends of LaVilla, known as the "Harlem of the South," live on within the walls of the refurbished museum and theatre. Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum is committed to reclaiming the past, celebrating the present, and embracing the future.
    Minskoff Theatre, United States
  200 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Disney presents a musical that brings The Lion King's wildly popular story, the Oscar winning Elton John / Tim Rice songs, and an entire African landscape to the stage of the specially adapted Minskoff Theater. Directed and designed by Tony Award winner Julie Taymor, THE LION KING fills the theatre with sights and sounds of one of Broadways most imaginative new talents - all to bring new life to Disneys crowd pleasing story of a young princes adventure-filled journey to adulthood - and the throne.
Giraffes strut, birds swoop, gazelles leap! The entire savanna comes to life and, as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly rises out of the stage. This is The Lion King. The winner of six 1998 Tony Awards, including Best New Musical, it is the story of a young lion cub named Simba who struggles to accept the responsibilities of adulthood and his destined role as king. To bring the classic 1994 film to life, Disney turned to the story's roots, its rich mythology, powerful human drama and primal African rhythms to create a fantastic new musical unlike anything Broadway has ever seen.
The modern theatre, with a very large seating capacity of 1,621 seats, was designed by the architectural firm of Kahn and Jacobs and offers a spectacular view of the Great White Way from the glass front of the building on all levels of the theatre.
    Center for Performing Arts, United States
  661 Route 308 - Rhinebeck, NY           
The Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck (known familiarly as The CENTER, and legally as Rhinebeck Performing Arts, Inc. or RPA) is a non-profit arts organization which offers performances and classes throughout the year. Performing and teaching artists are of local, national and international talent.
The Center serves as a regular performance venue for local theater companies including CENTERstage Productions (Death of a Salesman, Cabaret, My Fair Lady) the Gilbert & Sullivan Musical Theater Company (The Mikado, A Little Night Music, The Pirates of Penzance), Kids on Stage (Cinderella, The Emperor's New Clothes), Rhinebeck Theater Society (HONK!, The Complete Works of Shakespeare, Abridged, Oliver!), and Up In One Productions (Chicago, Fiddler on the Roof, The Wizard of Oz). The CENTER also hosts appearances by artists such as Jeff Boyer, Brian Bradley, Elaine Colandrea, Alpin Hong, Kitty Jones, Jeff McBride, The Puppet People, Solas an Lae, Tanglewood Marionettes, Pitchfork Militia, Barbara Rankin, and David Temple, to name a few.
    Music Box Teatre, United States
  239 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Music Box Theater is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 239 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
The most aptly named theater on Broadway, the intimate Music Box was designed by architect C. Howard Crane and constructed by composer Irving Berlin and producer Sam H. Harris specifically to house Berlin's famed Music Box Revues. It opened in 1921 and hosted a new musical production every year until 1925, when it presented its first play, Cradle Snatchers, starring Humphrey Bogart. The following year, Chicago, the Maurine Dallas Watkins play that served as the basis for the hit musical, opened here. It housed a string of hits for the playwriting team of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart, from their first collaboration Once in a Lifetime to their smash hit The Man Who Came to Dinner. Cole Porter and George and Ira Gershwin also presented shows here. Source
    Nederlander Theatre, United States
  208 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Known over the years as the National, the Billy Rose and the Trafalgar, The David T. Nederlander Theatre stands in honor of the patriarch of the Nederlander Family, now in it's third generation as the owners and operators of many of the most distinguished theatres and concert venues throughout America.
Built in 1921, some of the best known plays have been presented here including Cyrano de Bergerac, Private Lives, Julius Caesar, King Lear, and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. One of its most distinguished attractions was Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, for which she won a special Tony Award®.
    Ethel Barrymore Theatre, United States
  243 West 47th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Ethel Barrymore Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 243 West 47th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp and constructed by the Shuberts, it opened on December 20, 1928 with The Kingdom of God, a play selected by leading lady Ethel Barrymore. Over the next dozen years she returned to star in The Love Duel (1929), Scarlett Sister Mary (1930), The School for Scandal (1931), and An International Incident (1940).
It is the only surviving theatre of the many the Shuberts built for performers who were affiliated with them. It has been used continuously as a legitimate house, unlike many of the older theatres that have been used for a variety of purposes throughout the years. Source
    Beacon Theatre, United States
  2124 Broadway - New York, NY             
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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees, Lynyrd Skynyrd continues to make music and rock stages. Don't miss this legendary band at The Beacon Theatre on January 15!
The Beacon Theatre is the "older sister" to Radio City Music Hall. Both legendary venues were the "brainchild" of Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel, the great theatrical impresario and visionary of his time.
    Manhattan Center, United States
  311 West 34th Street - The Hammerstein, The Grand - New York, NY           
Home to two of Manhattan’s most unique event spaces. The Hammerstein and The Grand offer an elegant setting for events of all kinds. With in-house recording studios, television studios and video post production facilities, the Manhattan Center has what it takes to make your next event a complete multimedia experience.
Located at 311 West 34th Street, the historic Manhattan Center building still stands over 100 years after it was first built as the Manhattan Opera House by Oscar Hammerstein I in 1906. Hammerstein built the opera house with the bold intention to take on the established Metropolitan Opera by featuring cheaper seats for the ordinary New Yorker. The Manhattan Opera house quickly became an alternative venue for many great operas and celebrated singers to make their debut.
    St. James Theatre, United States
  246 West 44th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Grammy® Award-winning superstar Barry Manilow returns to the Broadway stage for the first time in more than two decades! Don't miss this unprecedented limited engagement as one of our most beloved entertainers performs songs from his massive catalog of hits in an intimate setting at the St. James Theatre on Broadway. From “Mandy” to "I Write the Songs" to "Copacabana (At The Copa)" and so many more, Manilow’s new Broadway show is destined to be as legendary as the man himself.
The St. James Theatre is located at 246 W. 44th St. Broadway, New York City, New York. It was built by Abraham L. Erlanger, theatrical producer and a founding member of the Theatrical Syndicate, on the site of the original Sardi's restaurant. It opened in 1927 as The Erlanger. Upon Erlanger's death in 1930, control of the venue was taken over by the Astor family, who owned the land on which the theatre stood. The Astors renamed it the St. James Theatre.
The theatre was purchased by the Shuberts in the late 1930s. They were forced to sell it to the William L. McKnight in 1957 following the loss of an antitrust case. McKnight renovated the St. James and reopened it in 1958. In 1970, McKnight then transferred the theatre to his daughter Virginia and her husband James H. Binger, who had formed the Jujamcyn Amusement Corporation. Source
    Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, United States
  236 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 236 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Herbert J. Krapp to resemble the neighboring Shubert and Booth theaters designed by Henry B. Herts, the building was constructed by the Shubert brothers in 1917-1918, christened the Plymouth Theatre, and leased to producer Arthur Hopkins. He intended it to be a venue for legitimate plays starring notable actors like John and Lionel Barrymore. The premiere production was A Successful Calamity, a comedy with William Gillette and Estelle Winwood.
After Hopkins died in 1948, control of the theater returned to the Shuberts, who still own the property, which was designated a New York City landmark in 1987. The 1,080-seat house was renamed for Gerald Schoenfeld, chairman of the Shubert Organization, in 2005. Source
    Barrymore Theatre, United States
  2090 Atwood Avenue - Madison, WI            
The Barrymore Theatre (originally The Eastwood) was built in 1929 as the third movie theater erected in Madison, Wisconsin. It sustained itself as a neighborhood movie theater until the late 70's. The theater was briefly vacant in the early 80's and was renovated into a live events theatre in 1987. That is when it took up it's present name, and began the transformation into what it is today. Source
    Barter Theatre, United States
  127 West Main Street - Virginia, VA           
"Our passion can be felt in two unique venues of live performance. From Barter Theatre, able to accommodate 507 patrons, to the more intimate Barter Stage II with 167 seats around a thrust stage...where the action is up-close and personal. Set inside a historical building across the street from Barter Theatre, Barter Stage II is a great place to enjoy a Barter production. Also, located in the lobby at Barter Stage II is The Caf?. You can stop in for lunch or dinner any day, and enjoy delicious specialty sandwiches, desserts, coffees and more! The Player Company, the youth stage of the Barter, produces plays for teachers and students."
    Brooklyn Academy of Music, United States
  30 Lafayette Avenue - Brooklyn, NY              
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2013 Winter/Spring Season. Based on The Suit by Can Themba, Mothobi Mutloatse, and Barney Simon Direction, adaptation, and music by Peter Brook, Marie-Hélène Estienne, and Franck Krawczyk The renowned Peter Brook—whose 1987 production of The Mahabharata inaugurated the BAM Majestic Theater (now the BAM Harvey Theater)—returns with a music-filled adaptation of South African writer Can Themba’s piercing tale of simmering resentment and tragedy, The Suit. A wife caught in the act, her lover fleeing the scene, a suit left behind. It’s the perfect recipe for a husband’s punishing, humiliating decree: go on with business as usual, he says to his spouse, but take your lover’s suit everywhere you go as a ghostly reminder of your betrayal. Using an innovative staging that integrates live musicians directly into the action, Brook makes Themba’s volatile work sing. A hummed “Strange Fruit,” African melodies, and Schubert lieder thicken the tense, poisoned air of this apartheid-era summer in which a shared wound was not allowed to heal.
Dating from its first performance in 1861, BAM has grown into a thriving urban arts center that brings international performing arts and film to Brooklyn. The first BAM facility at 176-194 Montague Street in Brooklyn Heights was originally conceived by the Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn as a home for its concerts. It housed a large theater seating 2,200, a smaller concert hall, dressing and chorus rooms, and a vast "baronial" kitchen. BAM presented both amateur and professional music and theater productions. Performers included Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Tomas Salvini, and Fritz Kreisler.
    Walter Kerr Theatre, United States
  218 West 48th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Heiress is the story of Catherine Sloper, the shy and sheltered daughter of a prominent New Yorker. Caught between the demands of an emotionally distant father and the attentions of a passionate young suitor, Catherine must navigate the terrain of love and regret, desire and duty, a chance for happiness and the burden of fortune…as only an heiress can.
The timeless New York story of society, status and the true cost of love. Jessica Chastain (Academy Award® nominee for The Help) makes her Broadway debut alongside David Strathairn (Academy Award® nominee for Good Night, and Good Luck), Dan Stevens (Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey) and Judith Ivey (two-time Tony Award® winner), in the Tony Award®-winning play, The Heiress. Written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz and directed by Tony Award® nominated playwright and director Moisés Kaufman, this compelling drama will run for an 18-week limited engagement.
    Round House Theatre, United States
  4545 East-West Highway - Bethesda, MD           
One of the largest and most acclaimed professional theatre companies in the metro Washington, DC area, Round House Theatre is led by Producing Artistic Director Blake Robison, who joined the company in June 2005. Based in Montgomery County, Maryland, Round House Theatre produces nearly 200 theatrical performances each season at its 400-seat Bethesda theatre and 150-seat black box theatre in Silver Spring. The company operates an education center in Silver Spring and annually reaches over 40,000 patrons there and across the region with strong educational programs.
    Booth Theatre, United States
  222 West 45th Street - Theatre District - New York, NY           
The Booth Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 222 West 45th Street in midtown-Manhattan, New York City.
The venue was the second New York City theatre to bear this name. The first was built by Booth himself in 1869 on the corner of 23rd Street and 6th Avenue.
The Booth Theatre appeared in the West Wing episode Posse Comitatus. It hosted a fictitous charity performance of War of the Roses which an equally fictitious President Bartlett attended while pondering the planned assassination of the Quamari Defence Minister. Source
    Broadway Theatre, United States
  1681 Broadway - Theatre District - New York, NY           
Coming up: Rodgers And Hammerstein's Cinderella. Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is coming to Broadway for the first time ever! Four-time Tony Award nominee Douglas Carter Beane’s (Sister Act, Xanadu) delightfully romantic and hilarious take on the ultimate makeover story features all the classic elements you remember—the pumpkin, the glass slipper, the masked ball and more—plus some surprising new twists! Rediscover some of Rodgers + Hammerstein's most beloved songs, including “In My Own Little Corner,” “Impossible/It’s Possible” and “Ten Minutes Ago" in this outrageously fun Broadway musical for dreamers of all ages. And not to worry... you'll be home well before the stroke of midnight!
The Broadway Theatre is a legitimate Broadway theatre located at 1681 Broadway in midtown-Manhattan.
Designed by architect Eugene DeRosa for Benjamin S. Moss, it opened as B.S. Moss's Colony Theatre on Christmas Day 1924 as a venue for vaudeville shows and motion pictures. It was re-named Universal's Colony Theatre, B.S. Moss' Broadway Theatre, and Earl Carroll's Broadway Theatre before becoming a legitimate house simply called Broadway Theatre on December 8, 1930 . (In 1937, known as Ciné Roma, it showed Italian films). The Shuberts bought it in 1939. It was renovated extensively in 1956 and 1986. The large stage (nearly sixty feet deep) and seating capacity (1761) have made it a popular theatre for musicals throughout the years.
    Kodak Theatre, United States
  6801 Hollywood Boulevard - Hollywood, CA           
Kodak Theatre is the crown jewel of the Hollywood & Highland Center retail, dining and entertainment complex located in the heart of historic Hollywood. The 3,332 seat theatre opened in November 2001 and soon thereafter became known to more than one billion people across the globe as the first permanent home of the Academy Awards®.
Built at a cost of $94 million, Kodak Theatre was designed by the internationally-renowned Rockwell Group to be as glamorous as its onstage artists and celebrity guests, yet capable of serving the enormous technical needs of a live worldwide television broadcast on Oscar® night. The naming of Kodak Theatre, in a 20-year marketing partnership with Eastman Kodak Co., was one of the most significant non-sports corporate sponsorships in history. Kodak’s prominence and long-standing connection to the film industry in Hollywood made the relationship a natural. In fact, for the 78th consecutive year, ever since the inception of the Academy Awards, Best Picture was produced on Kodak film.